Cake for breakfast?

Cake for breakfast?

Most diets don’t seem very pleasant, but hearing you can eat cake for the most important meal of the day sounds pretty good.

This “diet” concept has been talked about for years; in 2012, a study published in the journal Steroids claimed that among 200 participants, those who ate a large breakfast followed by cake or another dessert reported feeling less hungry and having fewer cravings during the day.

But Dr. Robert Martin, a family medicine physician at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in Chicago, says this morning indulgence shouldn’t become a daily habit.

“The major dietary risk factor for medical problems like obesity and type 2 diabetes is probably an excess of added sugar,” he says. “This study was done in another country on a fairly small scale, so I’m not sure we can expect the same results in a larger U.S. population.”

And while another 2012 study published in the journal Appetite associates chocolate intake with improved cognitive function. Dr. Martin expresses skepticism.

“This study demonstrated an association, not a cause and effect, between patients who reported eating chocolate and their scores on cognitive tests,” says Dr. Martin. “I do not think that people should eat more chocolate in hopes of improving their memory.”

Eating cake for breakfast in order to lose weight sounds too good to be true, and Dr. Martin agrees. So what should you eat?

“Stick mainly to the produce aisle in your grocery store, cook food at home as much as possible and avoid foods that are highly processed or come out of a factory,” he recommends.

Related Posts

Comments

2 Comments

  1. Wise advice. Very well written article.

  2. Dr. Tony Hampton
    Tony Hampton, MD, MBA August 7, 2018 at 5:12 pm · Reply

    I agree that eating cake or any other sugary item for breakfast is not the best way to start your day but if the temptation is too difficult to resist, consider this low carb chocolate cake recipe with only 6 net carbs. The ingredients contain no added sugar or wheat flour and when eaten with berries and topped with whipped cream, it’s sure to please. Even so, better eaten for lunch or dinner to add that healthier dark chocolate to your diet.

    https://plus.google.com/photos/photo/107499413209751890994/6567497588036308098

    Recipe from Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt

About the Author

Rina Jacobs
Rina Jacobs

Rina Jacobs, health enews contributor, is an intern in public affairs and marketing at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in Chicago. She is currently a student at Yeshiva University in New York City and is working towards a degree in Media Studies and Advertising. During her free time, you can catch Rina going to spin class, binge watching a Netflix series or sitting outside with an iced coffee.