Are you battling binge eating?

Are you battling binge eating?

Recently, tennis star Monica Seles used her fame to shed light on the most common eating disorder in the United State – binge eating disorder or BED.  Featured in a PSA about the disease, Seles partnered with the Binge Eating Disorder Association, the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) and, drug company, Shire, to share her story.

Seles recently told the media, “It took a while until I felt comfortable talking about it. That’s one of the reasons I decided to do this campaign; to raise awareness that binge eating is a real medical condition.”

The National Eating Disorders Association estimates that BED affects 2.8 million U.S. adults. But not all individuals who are overweight have BED.

Unlike other eating disorders, BED is almost as common in men as in women.

According to Dr. Carmen Chase, psychiatrist with Advocate Medical Group in Normal, Ill., the condition often points to issues of self-esteem, not just poor control. Addressing the self-esteem issues can improve the outlook for those with the condition.

“Treatment approaches can be with medications or therapy,” Dr. Chase says. “Together, they will work better. This is ultimately a learned behavior, a coping mechanism. Treatment of the thing one is coping with can reduce the binges. Behavioral modification, mindfulness and medications together can be helpful over time.”

For a free, anonymous eating disorder screening, visit MyBodyScreening.org.

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Comments

3 Comments

  1. Excellent….looking into this now at Good Samaritan. Thank you.

  2. Rosemary Mueller
    Rosemary Mueller, MPH, RD, LDN February 12, 2015 at 1:04 pm · Reply

    As a dietitian with over 30 years’ experience in eating disorder and obesity treatment, thank you for this important article. BED is real, with serious metabolic/physiological as well as emotional consequences. Here are Advocate Weight Management, we have realized the benefit of hunger management through meal timing and provision of sufficient protein at intervals to adjunctively minimize the propensity to binge. For more information about our program, please contact Advocate Weight Management at 847 990-5770 or email us at advocateweightmanagement@advocatehealth.com

About the Author

Lynn Hutley
Lynn Hutley

Lynn Hutley, health enews contributor, is coordinator of public affairs and marketing at Advocate BroMenn Medical Center and Advocate Eureka Hospital in central Illinois. Having grown up in a family-owned drug store, it is no surprise that Lynn has spent almost 18 years working in the health care industry. She has a degree in human resources management from Illinois State University and is always ready to tackle Trivia Night.