Are red moles dangerous?

Are red moles dangerous?

If you’re about 30 years old or older, you may have noticed the random and sudden appearance of little red dots on your skin, sometimes raised or sometimes flat. You may have even wondered if you had a run-in with a red Sharpie somewhere along the course of your day.

What should I do if I suspect I have a red mole?

“You can usually self-diagnose a cherry angioma, or red mole,” explains Dr. Gary Metcalf, a family medicine practitioner at Aurora Medical Center – Bay Area in Marinette, Wis. “It’s not usually necessary to have a medical professional diagnose.”

So, are they dangerous?

“Red moles are really just a cluster of overgrown blood vessels and are thought to be genetic,” says Dr. Metcalf. “They are entirely harmless.”

Sure, but what if I don’t like how they look?

Though benign, if you prefer to remove red moles for cosmetic purposes, Dr. Metcalf describes procedures for removal:

  • Cryosurgery, or freezing with liquid nitrogen, to terminate the mole
  • Laser surgery uses heat to destroy the mole
  • Shave excision is more like traditional surgery, in that it may require the mole to be dug or cut out
  • Electric current can also be used to extinguish the mole

Do I ever need to see a doctor for a red mole?

“Even though red moles do tend to change over time, you should see a doctor if it changes in size, shape or color, as you would with a regular mole,” Dr. Metcalf says. “As always, if something is concerning you, don’t hesitate to seek a medical professional.”

Related Posts

Comments

About the Author

Brianna Wunsch
Brianna Wunsch

Brianna Wunsch, health enews contributor, is a public affairs specialist for Advocate Aurora Health with a BA in public affairs from University of Wisconsin - Green Bay. In her free time, Brianna enjoys living an active lifestyle through biking, hiking and working out at the gym, but even more than that, she especially loves spending quality time with her two cats (Arthur and Loki), son and husband.