Driving in flip-flops can be deadly

Driving in flip-flops can be deadly

With some hot summer days still left this season, flip-flops may be your shoe of choice until the fall air freezes your toes.

But you may think again, especially when hitting the road, after hearing the results of a recent British survey.

Sheila’s Wheels, the insurance company behind the poll, released the frightening findings of the serious dangers flip-flops pose when worn while driving.

The company found that the flimsy footwear results in about 1.4 million close-calls and accidents each year. The company hopes that people will not take these results lightly.

They even say that flips flops are more dangerous to drive in than high heels, making it hard to brake safely. In comparison with high heeled shoes, wearing flip-flops can take double the amount of time to move your foot from the brake pedal to the accelerator.

A third of the 1,055 motorists surveyed said that they wear flip-flops while driving. And 27 percent of them say their flip-flop shoe choice has warranted some type of misfortune or accident.

Another scary statistic finds that one in nine women confess that their flip-flop has been caught underneath the pedal while in drive. Under driving simulators, the company found that flip-flops actually can slow a person’s break time by about .13 seconds.

Many people, one in five, said they never would have thought their shoe choice could affect their safety while driving.

“It’s worrying that so many drivers out there do not realize the impact their footwear choices can have on their safety at the wheel,” said Sheila’s Wheels spokeswoman, Jacky Brown, in a statement.

“Millions may think they can drive safely but may not realize the shortcomings of the flip-flop until it’s too late – putting themselves, their passengers and other drivers at risk every time they get in the car,” Brown added.

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8 Comments

  1. My flip flop became tangled with the accelerator while I was driving on Lake Shore Drive. I had to miss my intended exit as slowing down was a challenge with my platform flip- flop under the gas pedal. I had to quickly bend down and remove the shoe. Fortunately, I was able to do this safely. That was 25 years ago and I have not driven in flip-flops since.

  2. I’ll definitely be changing my ways while driving! If I’m wearing heels, I have actually brought sandals in my car to switch into before driving. I guess I should keep a shoe with full support in my car instead!

  3. I think you meant to write “brake” instead of “break.” See below.
    brake1
    /brāk,
    noun
    noun: brake; plural noun: brakes1. a device for slowing or stopping a moving vehicle, typically by applying pressure to the wheels.
    “he slammed on his brakes”
    •a thing that slows or hinders a process.
    “managers have a duty to put the brakes on growth when it is unsustainable”
    synonyms: curb, check, restraint, restriction, constraint, control, limitation More”a brake on research”
    verb
    verb: brake; 3rd person present: brakes; past tense: braked; past participle: braked; gerund or present participle: braking1. make a moving vehicle slow down or stop by using a brake.
    “drivers who brake abruptly”
    synonyms: slow down, slow, decelerate, reduce speed, stop More

  4. Sarah
    If we all stop our cars in good time we will live long enough to make spelling mistakes.

  5. We should all take more time to think about the little things that can make us safer behind the wheel. Footwear, eliminating distractions like cell phone use and eating, not driving while we are drowsy or angry are all the types of things that could greatly reduce the total number of auto accidents every year based upon the cumulative effect of many people taking small steps.


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About the Author

Sarah Scroggins
Sarah Scroggins

Sarah Scroggins, health enews editor, is a public affairs and marketing coordinator at Advocate Health Care. She has five years of public relations and marketing experience with a Masters degree in Communications with an emphasis in PR. Sarah is a newlywed with one pet, a small but feisty pomapoo. She prides herself on being a self-proclaimed (OK, everyone knows it) social media addict. In addition, she is a fitness fanatic with a love for photography and reality TV.

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