Life-long benefits of higher servings of veggies

Life-long benefits of higher servings of veggies

A recent study published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health in the United Kingdom (UK) and reported by CNN, suggests that eating seven servings of fruits and vegetables can cut the risk of premature death by about 40 percent.

Researchers from the University College London examined The Healthy Surveys for England, annual surveys conducted to measure health, for data between 2001 and 2008 of more than 65,000 adults. The adults were ages 35 and older, and were surveyed on their fruit and vegetable consumption.

The research concluded that the average adult ate about 3.8 servings, based on the UK Department of Health’s guidelines. Those who ate more vegetables and fruit were linked with a lower body mass index (BMI).

The data collected from the survey was then compared with the participants’ mortality data following after eight years. The results showed that every increase in fruit and vegetable servings lead to a lower risk of earlier death. The data also showed that seven servings a day had the most positive impact on the participants.

Participants who did eat about seven servings of fruit and vegetables every day had about a 40 percent lower risk of death then those who ate less than one serving. Researchers also said that those eating bigger serving sizes of fruits and vegetables had a 25 percent lower chance of passing away from cancer, and about a 30 percent lower chance from heart disease.

“The more fresh whole foods you can eat will improve your health,” Dr. Jennifer Debruler, internal medicine physical with Advocate Medical Group says. “I agree with the study.”

Researchers also found that vegetables contain more health benefits than fruit. If you are going to “up” your serving sizes, it is best to do so in vegetable consumption, the authors suggested. A balanced diet of fruits and higher vegetable intake is essential to health benefits, research concludes.

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Comments

4 Comments

  1. Had a feeling my mom was right about this…

  2. I think a more sensible and honest conclusion would be that eating more vegetables is linked to a lower BMI (not surprising given that fiber is filling). They don’t point out that a lower/BMI in itself is associated with a lower incidence of heart disease, cancer, stroke, etc. To assume that it is the vegetables doing something “magical” without using scientific technique is at best poor science and at worst, intellectually dishonest.

  3. They are tasty though…

  4. Researchers also found that vegetables contain more health benefits THAN fruit. If you are going to “up” your serving sizes, it is best to do so in vegetable consumption, the authors suggested. A balanced diet of fruits and higher vegetable intake is essential to health benefits, research concludes.

    **Then should be than.**

    Other than that, great article.

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health enews Staff
health enews Staff

health enews staff is a group of experienced writers from our Advocate Health Care sites, also including freelance or intern writers.