Infographic: Be wary of pesticides on fruits and veggies

Infographic: Be wary of pesticides on fruits and veggies

Dirty Dozen Infographic - Health enews

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18 Comments

  1. I understand that these items should be bought organic, but when it comes to the price difference between organic and non-organic, the organic items are just a little too expensive.

    • Buying organic is expensive but so is cancer treatment, plus there’s no guaranteed to be cured.
      Do everything you can to reduce your risk. That’s all anyone can do. 🙂

  2. Louise Peterson May 7, 2015 at 11:11 am · Reply

    I understand that even organically grown fruits and vegetables are not always safe. Is there any way to clean produce beyond rinsing in water or in the case of potatoes scrubbing with a vegetable brush? I’ve heard that washing in vinegar can remove pesticides or other particles. Anything else that can be done? Thank you.

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 8, 2015 at 3:24 pm · Reply

      Hi Louise,

      Thank you for your question! We’ve reached out to our expert, Rosemary Mueller, and will get back to you with a response as soon as possible.

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 13, 2015 at 9:19 am · Reply

      Hi Louise,

      Rosemary Mueller, Registered Dieitian at Advocate Medical Group Weight Management says:

      Vinegar may help reduce, but won’t eliminate bacterial contamination and may slightly affect the taste of your produce. It may not remove all pesticides.

      Overall recommendation: Use very cold, clean tap water or spray with distilled water and/or scrub produce to reduce pesticides and microbes. For produce with thick skin, use a vegetable brush to help wash away hard-to-remove microbes.

  3. This is a great article, however, not everyone can spring for the cost of buying organic. What are some ways to “wash” off those fruits and vegetables?

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 8, 2015 at 3:22 pm · Reply

      Thanks for your question! We’ve reached out to our expert, Rosemary Mueller, and will get back to you with a response as soon as possible.

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 13, 2015 at 9:25 am · Reply

      Hi Nikki,

      Rosemary Mueller, Registered Dieitian at Advocate Medical Group Weight Management recommends:

      Use very cold, clean tap water or spray with distilled water and/or scrubb produce to help reduce pesticides and microbes.

      For produce with thick skin, use a vegetable brush to help wash away hard-to-remove microbes.

      Produce with a lot of nooks and crannies like cauliflower, broccoli or lettuce should be soaked for 1 to 2 minutes in cold clean water.

  4. If there is pesticide residue on the fruit and vegetables, what are the best ways to eliminate them before consumption or because they were grown in soil that had pesticides applied to it, the chemicles can not be removed from the fruit or vegetable?

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 8, 2015 at 3:22 pm · Reply

      Hi Joe,

      That’s a great question! We’ve reached out to our expert, Rosemary Mueller, and will get back to you with a response as soon as possible. Thanks!

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 13, 2015 at 9:26 am · Reply

      Hi Joe,

      Rosemary Mueller, Registered Dieitian at Advocate Medical Group Weight Management recommends:

      Use very cold, clean tap water or spray with distilled water and/or scrubb produce to help reduce pesticides and microbes.

      For produce with thick skin, use a vegetable brush to help wash away hard-to-remove microbes.

      Produce with a lot of nooks and crannies like cauliflower, broccoli or lettuce should be soaked for 1 to 2 minutes in cold clean water.

  5. Missing from the list: blueberries, kale/green collards, lettuce.

  6. How about greenhouse grown produce? I can’t find organic cucumbers or grapes, organic peppers are extremely expensive. (the one time I purchased them I paid around $17 for 6 of them) This year I’m going to plant my first vegetable garden with produce that I buy regularly. Unfortunately, the growing season in IL is only a few months.

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 8, 2015 at 3:25 pm · Reply

      Hi Susan,

      Great question! We’ve reached out to our expert, Rosemary Mueller, and will get back to you with a response as soon as possible. Thanks!

    • Vanessa Tamayo May 13, 2015 at 9:29 am · Reply

      Hi Susan,

      Rosemary Mueller, Registered Dieitian at Advocate Medical Group Weight Management says:

      Homegrown and farmers’ market fruits and vegetables should also be well-washed.

      Quick tips:
      Use very cold, clean tap water or spray with distilled water. Distilled or bottled water has been filtered and purified to remove contaminants.

      After washing, dry with clean paper towel. This can help remove more bacteria.

  7. I have gone organic for some time. What do you spend your money on? What is better than eating foods to maintain your good health. Besides, organic foods taste better.

  8. You very seldom see organic potatoes, and organic bell peppers are too expensive, but I have been buying organic, and only organic, strawberries, apples, and peaches for quite a while.

  9. If I was to put 2 apples on a table, organic and non organic, 99% of you would have no idea which is which. Just because a store, a person, or a company advertises something as ‘organic’ doesn’t mean that it truly is. Sure there would be huge implications if someone was to find out but still, majority if not all of the folks out there would have no idea how to tell difference whatsoever. It’s just the times we live in. We tend to trust the companies out there to do the right thing, but everyone knows that after all they are after our hard earned money and not our health. It’s sad but it’s true.

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health enews Staff
health enews Staff

health enews staff is a group of experienced writers from our Advocate Aurora Health sites, which also includes freelance or intern writers.